(904) 287-2527

Our Veterinarians are available for Pet Emergencies

We all hope that an emergency medical situation will never happen to our pet, but it is always wise to be prepared. Even though we operate by appointments, we will always be here for you and your pet if there is a medical emergency. With Dr. Bredehoeft’s 5 years of experience in emergency medicine, he is prepared like few others to handle your pet’s needs.

If you have an emergency after hours, please call 287-2507 and leave a phone number where we can reach you. If you have not heard back from us within 15 minutes, please call the Clay Duval Pet Emergency Clinic in Orange Park at 904-264-8281 or the Affiliated Veterinary Emergency Center on Southside Boulevard at 904-642-5911.

THESE ARE SOME EMERGENCIES THAT WARRANT IMMEDIATE MEDICAL ATTENTION:

  • Hit by car If your pet is not able to get up or stand, spinal injuries might have occurred. In this case try to secure your pet on a wooden board, similar to a stretcher. Keep him or her warm, especially if shock is suspected.
  • Heat stroke (105′F-110′F) Especially if your pet is not responsive. Try to cool down his or her body temperature to 104′F, before seeking medical attention.
  • Any Injury to the eye
  • Allergic Reactions Especially when generalized swelling is present, or your pet has difficulty breathing or swallowing.
  • Heart Failure Possible signs of this are sudden onset of cough, lack of appetite, and lethargy in a geriatric patient.
  • Snakebite
  • Urinary Blockage A male cat or dog, that is not able to urinate or has difficulty doing so (repeatedly going to the litter box, straining with no production of urine, licking, and/or vocalizing).
  • Dystocia A pet that is trying to give birth, has contractions, and has not produced a puppy or kitten after 2 hours.
  • Cluster Seizures (multiple seizures in a row) or Continuous seizures (status epilepticus). Singular seizures are quite common, especially in dogs. If they do not last longer than 1 or 2 minutes, a medical work up can probably wait until the next day.
  • Fractures/Wounds Anything with exposure of muscle or bone tissue including but not limited to bites, gunshot, or stab wounds.
  • Inability of your pet to get up or stand without assistance. He or she may have experienced an injury to the spine, similar to a protruding disc in a person.
  • Fever in excess of 104′ F.
  • Profuse Vomiting (2-3 times daily) and diarrhea mixed with blood and mucous should be reasons to be concerned. Dehydration can quickly set in and you should seek immediate medical attention. Occasional vomiting (once a month or less) is not unusual in some pets, especially those with a sensitive stomach. A cat might vomit (signs resemble wretching) to produce a hairball.
  • Hot Spot This is a bacterial infection of the skin that is typically caused by excessive licking or scratching, leading to moist and inflamed lesions. This reaction is often brought on by insect bites or stings and other allergic reactions. They can quickly progress, requiring cortisone and antibiotic treatment as soon as possible.
  • Exposure to or Ingestion of Toxic Chemicals/Foreign Bodies. It is important to know the product name and the amount ingested. Provide us with as much information as possible for your appointment. A single Aspirin or Tylenol in a 50-pound dog is relatively safe, but can be deadly in a cat or a small dog.
  • Swollen or Distended Abdomen With or without vomiting.
  • Unusual or Erratic Behavior
  • Bleeding that does not stop in 5 minutes.
  • Difficulty Breathing  Tongue/gums are bluish in color.
  • Collapse or Loss of Consciousness

THE FOLLOWING MEDICATIONS ARE RELATIVELY SAFE, WHEN USED IN A NON-EMERGENCY SITUATION, WHERE YOUR VETERINARIAN CANNOT BE REACHED:

Pain:

  • Tylenol: Dog: 5mg/lb every 12 hours for a couple of days. Cat: NEVER!
  • Aspirin: Dog: 7.5 mg/lb every 12 hours for a couple of days.  Cat: (approx. 10 lbs.) one baby aspirin, not more than twice 56 hours apart.
  • Constipation: Pumpkin pie filling (Libby’s canned) one tbsp per 10 lbs. of body weight twice daily added to food.
  • Diarrhea: Dog: Pepto Bismol (without Xylitol) 1/4 to 1/2 cc per lb. every 12 hours. Cat: NEVER!
  • Coughing: Robitussin DM 1 tbsp per 10 lbs. of body weight every 6 -8 hours.
  • Allergic reaction (excessive scratching or licking): Benadryl 1mg per pound of body weight every 8-12 hours.

HUMAN FOODS THAT CAN BE TOXIC WHEN INGESTED BY ANIMALS:

  • Onions (Thiosulfates)
  • Dark Chocolate, “Baker’s Chocolate” (Theobromine)
  • Fruit Pits and Seeds (Cyanide)
  • Potato Peelings and Green Potatoes (Oxalates)
  • Caffeine
  • Alcohol
  • Raw Eggs (Salmonella)
  • Artificial Sweetener (those that contain Xylitol)